Stroll Along Stoney Point, Near Duluth

Stroll along Lake Superior at Stoney Point, North Shore, MN

One of the most relaxing places to hike on the North Shore MN is on Stoney Point Drive. Many people know this one-mile stretch along Lake Superior as Stoney Point, Duluth. But it’s actually right in between Duluth and Two Harbors, MN. The gravel country road, Stoney Point Drive near Duluth, takes you along some of the most scenic Lake Superior Shoreline!

Drive or stroll along this one-mile loop off of Scenic 61 on the North Shore. On the east side of Stoney Point Drive, there is an inviting ledgerock and cobblestone beach on Lake Superior. It has been called, “a great place to escape from reality.”

Stoney Point Duluth

Stoney Point, near Duluth

On a nice day, it’s common to see people sunning on the ledgerock, rock hunting, admiring Lake Superior, or playing with their kids and/or dogs. Bicyclists often come here from Duluth or Two Harbors as well. 

 

Stoney Point, Lake Superior

Relax on Lake Superior at Stoney Point

This is one of the best spots to relax in the sun on a calm day or wave-watch on a stormy day. Hint: on a stormy day, you might find Lake Superior surfers here! 

Lake Superior wave watching, Stoney Point, Duluth

Stormy wave watching at Stoney Point, Lake Superior

 

Continuing along Stoney Point Drive near Two Harbors takes you along a quiet, country road with wildflowers and expansive Lake Superior views. All along the way, you’ll soak in the mood of the great Gitchi Gami (aka Lake Superior). 

Stoney Point, Lake Superior, near Duluth and Two Harbors

Country road along Lake Superior

It’s a perfect place to hike along the North Shore, MN (or stroll :))!

How to get there

Stoney Point Drive is a loop connecting with Scenic 61 in two spots. At about mile marker 15, look for Lake County 222 (Stoney Point Drive). 

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6 thoughts on “Stroll Along Stoney Point, Near Duluth

  1. Erik Wilkie says:

    Please remember that Stoney Point is Private Property,…NOT a city beach.
    Have GREAT RESPECT for this sacred spot. Pick up any trash, clean up after your DOG. Remind others to respect this private beach and the homeowners who pay the taxes. Thank YOu…..e..

  2. Michael D Gustafson says:

    Arriving back in Minnesota in a week…means that I will be spending some time at my daughter’s cabin north of Duluth this summer and available to visit with anyone about the research I have completed at this site and made part of a power point presentation.

  3. Michael Gustafson says:

    As I continue to research the CCC camp along the shore of Lake Superior approximately three miles southwest of Knife River, Minnesota…I have personally met with Barbara Sommer who is the author of Working Hard and a Good Deal as well as directed to a retired professor who is writing a book on CCC camps in Northeastern Minnesota. I have also discovered that the original idea for the Stoney Point Drive and Wayside Park was created by Clarence Congdon who envisioned the Wayside Park as a terminus for the Lakeshore Blvd in 1913. He actually purchased right away and as a legislator also helped to pass a bill in 1916 allowing the city of Duluth to purchase property necessary to complete this Blvd by imminent domain. The Mn/DOT report called the Historic Roadside Development Structures on Minnesota Trunk Highways provides some insight to the inventory and potential restoration. I am looking forward to visiting the History Center in Chisholm yet this fall.

  4. Michael Gustafson says:

    This specific location is associated with the CCC camp known as SP 18 and the history suggests that Stoney Point Drive as actually created as a joint project with the camp and the Minnesota Highway Department in 1935. The drive essentially created what is commonly referred to as Lakeshore Wayside Park. My father in law was in this camp as it started in the fall of 1935 and transferred out in April of 1936. The camp continued until the fall of 1937.

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